Do you run a radio station or host a radio show? Is it mainstream or independent? Broadcast? An internet radio station? No matter the format or genre, if you have quality content, the time may be right to turn your radio show or shows into podcasts.

A radio podcast is a podcast taken from or inspired by a radio show. It is typically spoken-only, so any music from an original radio broadcast is edited out. The ads may also be removed, unless, of course, you offer a bundled rate and use the same sponsors for both. 

Beyond the ability to repurpose your content and double-down on advertisers, there are numerous other benefits to creating a podcast from a radio show.

Benefits of a Radio Podcast

Music is the basis for most radio stations: different formats and styles attract specific demographics and types of listeners. However, podcasts give stations the opportunity to expand their audience, acquiring plenty of new raving fans.

Ability for Replays. Not everyone listens to radio live, so people love the accessibility and availability of podcasts. Whether they prefer to listen during a commute or workout, or to wind down after a long day, they can get their quality content whenever and wherever they want. Plus, when someone discovers a new podcast they love, they are more likely to binge-listen to a bunch of previous episodes. And then see what else your station has to offer.

More Engagement. Whereas a traditional radio show gets most of their engagement right before, during, and after a broadcast, podcasts can draw in listeners at any time. Since podcasts live online, they are more interactive by nature. Create posts that encourage conversation. For instance start discussions related to a show topic that draw in listeners. Check in on those posts regularly, and respond accordingly to keep the conversation going.

Increased Audience. Podcasting is a wildly popular medium. When you start a podcast to add bonus content or repurpose material from your existing show, there’s plenty of demand. It’s an opportunity to introduce new people to your station and new content to listeners who want more. 

Regardless of any extra work it may require, a podcast is a value-add … and definitely worth considering.

Radio Station Podcasts Doing Things Right

The BBC (British Broadcasting Company) has a whole network of podcasts you can listen to online, many of which were converted from radio shows. There are 41 stations – some International – in their podcast network, so something for everyone. Formats range from full news, educational, and entertainment programs to after-show podcasts and “best of” highlights per episode or each week. 

The latter is an especially effective strategy if you have a music-based show that has great interviews, call-in elements, or excellent host rapport. Since a podcast is typically spoken-only, you can easily edit out the songs to create an amazing alternative podcast.

Global Group in the United Kingdom (Capital FM, Heart FM, etc) took podcasting a step further. They not only turn existing radio shows into podcasts and invest in unique podcasts, they and created a Global Player to make it easier for listeners to enjoy all of their podcasts – and radio content for that matter – wherever they are.

Decisions Decisions

Podcasts fall into a few different categories: solo show, interview show, multiple hosts, and co-hosts with guests. They can be informative, entertaining, or a little bit of both.

When considering whether to convert a radio show into a podcast, you want to set yourself up for success. Before committing, ask yourself:

  • Is this radio show popular enough to turn into a podcast? 
  • Do the hosts have an engaged social following?
  • Who is my listener? How – if at all – is the podcast listener different from a radio listener?
  • Is the content evergreen?
  • Which elements would make great stand-alone content?
  • In what ways can this show inspire raving fans?

When you can answer these questions in detail, you are ready for next steps.

Starting a Radio Podcast

As a radio station, you already have the content and the podcast set-up. All that remains is to decide what content you want to use and then create your show. The latter – turning the elements into a podcast – is something you can do yourself or see if there’s somebody already working at your station who wants to give it a try. 

Note: The only additional expenses would be podcast hosting and editing if you decide to outsource.

For your podcast, you will need to:

  • Choose the format and concept. Also see if you need to alter the title and branding.
  • Create a web page, cover art, and graphic social media posts for your podcast. You may want to create dedicated social media accounts, as well. 
  • Produce an intro and outro
  • Get a hosting provider. Options include Anchor, Spreaker, Libsyn, and more.
  • Link to multiple distribution channels, such as iTunes and Google Play

Note: if you are doing an after-show, you will need to conceptualize, write, and record complete episodes after each broadcast. 

Then, for each episode:

  • Produce/edit the content
  • Optimize metadata
  • Write descriptions
  • Upload and distribute
  • Share each episode on the dedicated web page, as well as on your radio station and podcast social media accounts
  • Repeat

Once you have your format – and after a little practice – it should be easy to produce and release a new episode each day or week. Remember to have fun with it. When you enjoy what you do, it really enhances the quality of the show.

Good luck.

What do you think? What are your thoughts on creating a podcast from a radio show? Share your thoughts in the comments.